How To Get Video Right For Business With Simon Banks Of Tallboy Communications

    Simon Banks of Tallboy Communications is the author of the book “How To Get Video Right,” which help businesses understand YouTube Video. Simon points them in the right direction on which videos are best used as sales or marketing ones and which are best used for educational and training purposes.

    GUEST: Simon Banks of TallBoy Communications | “How To Get Video Right – The BookTwitter | Instagram | Facebook | LinkedIn

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    HOSTS: The Video Marketing Value Podcast is hosted by:
    – Dane Golden of VidiUp.tv and VidTarget.io | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube
    – Renee Teeley of VideoExplained and ReneeTeeley.com | LinkedIn | Twitter |
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    SPONSORS: This episode is brought to you by our affiliate partners, including: TubeBuddyVidIQMorningFameRev.com, and other products and services we recommend.

    PRODUCER: Jason Perrier of Phizzy Studios

    TRANSCRIPT
    Simon Banks:
    My clients, they would spend a lot of money with me. Seriously, they would spend tens of thousands of dollars creating one video. They would upload it to YouTube, plunk it on the website, quite often buried, and then surprise, surprise, nothing happened. They were getting no views, no interaction. I thought, this is nuts. This is insane. Why would you want to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a video and not get anything back for it? I decided to write a book called How To Get Video Right?

    Dane Golden:
    It’s time for the Video Marketing Value podcast. This is the podcast where we help marketers and business owners just like you get more value out of your video marketing efforts. My name is Dane Golden from VidiUp.tv, where we help you up your game on YouTube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers. And my other businesses, VidTarget.io, where we help you get a higher return on your YouTube ad spend with targeted YouTube video placement lists. Along with my cohost, she’s the powerhouse video marketer from San Francisco, it’s R-E-N-E-E T-E-E-L-E-Y, Renee Teeley from VideoExplained. Hello, Renee.

    Renee Teeley:
    Hello, Dane. Today, I’m happy as a mouse with a cheese platter at a Michelin Star restaurant, to be co-hosting this podcast with you.

    Dane Golden:
    But, are you thrilled?

    Renee Teeley:
    I’m thrilled and delighted. I am all of the things.

    Dane Golden:
    She’s all the things. And Renee, what do you do at VideoExplained?

    Renee Teeley:
    Yeah, at VideoExplained, I offer video production and consulting services to help companies use video, to build their credibility, generate leads and convert those leads into paying customers.

    Dane Golden:
    Okay. And for you, the listener, you should know that as always, you can follow along on your podcast app by clicking the link that says the transcript and we’ll have links to our guest and you can also send us a message on social media, send us a tweet. Renee’s @RTeeley, I’m @DaneGolden. Let us know how you like the show. And today we have a special guest. It’s Simon Banks of Tallboy Communications in the UK and he’s the author of the business book, How to Get Video Right. And I would put for business, would that be right, Simon Banks?

    Simon Banks:
    Absolutely. That’s what I’m here for is to get video right for all my customers.

    Dane Golden:
    And Simon Banks, we’ve asked you on the Video Marketing Value podcast today because you’ve authored the book, How to Get Video Right, to help businesses understand YouTube video. In that book, you talk about the different types of videos that are the best used as sales or marketing videos and then there’s another type of video which is more educational or training video. And I thought we would go through these two different types of videos today. Does this topic work for you?

    Simon Banks:
    It certainly does.

    Renee Teeley:
    Great. I love this topic, particularly because I think a lot of businesses do struggle with figuring out what types of videos to create and not just the topics of the videos, but the actual type of video. And so it’s great to have you on and kind of go through the fact that there are so many different types of videos that businesses can be using. But before we dive into those, let’s just start off with, can you talk a little bit about what was your goal in writing this book, How to Get Video Right?

    Simon Banks:
    Well, I’ve been in the video industry world for a long time. We’re talking decades here and I’ve been producing videos for businesses and companies, all sorts of sizes from small to global companies. And I was seeing a trend coming along, which was getting video wrong so I decided probably not a good name for title of a book is Getting Video Wrong but that’s what I was seeing my clients. They would spend a lot of money with me. Seriously, they would spend tens of thousands of dollars creating one video. They would upload it to YouTube, plunk it on the website, quite often buried, and then surprise, surprise, nothing happened. They were getting no views, no interaction so I thought, this is nuts. This is insane. Why would you want to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a video and not get anything back for it? I decided to write a book called, How to Get Video Right.

    Dane Golden:
    Okay. And let’s get a rundown. What are the main kinds of sales and marketing videos that there are? And why they should be used? And the first one we want to ask you about is the company promo slash brand awareness video. What is that for?

    Simon Banks:
    Well, this is normally the video that I get approached for. When a potential client rings me, they often say, “We’re having a new website and we’ve been told we need a video.” And that’s it. They just say, “Can you make us a video?” And normally they just want a, what we call the corporate video. I personally think the corporate video is dead now because the days of, seriously I’ve produced these in 1972. X company was established in X place with a number of employees. And quite frankly, it’s like, no, we don’t want that kind of video anymore. And that’s what most companies do. They just want a video about themselves. That’s generally we all need, or businesses need a video about the business. But you really want to make a video about your audience, not about the what and the how. Really no one cares how long you’ve been in business. They want to know what solution, what challenges do you solve for your clients?

    Simon Banks:
    Generally it is an important video. This video is what we can call a corporate video. You can call it a brand video. You can call it a sales video. This is sort of video or a bouncers video even. And this is the kind of video that normally would go on the front page of your website or it could be the lead video on your YouTube channel. This is sort of primarily what most businesses invest a lot of money into making this video. The issue I have is they just spend the money making one video and that’s sort of like that’s insane. In this days you’ve got to have videos, plural, portable, not just video it’s videos. Hence in the chapter four in my book, I discuss about all the types of videos that you can have for your business.

    Renee Teeley:
    Yeah. I’ve actually run into that same issue at my business, which is when companies come to me to create a video for them, a video, it’s this video. It’s about the company and they really what they fall flat with is having a strategy for video, which includes more than one. But I do think that sometimes that video can be the gateway into video marketing. I guess that’s the plus side of it. Moving on to other types of videos, so you’ve in your book, you talk about demonstration and product demo videos. Can you tell us a little bit about what is that? And what are the goals behind a demonstration and product demo video?

    Simon Banks:
    Well, I’m going to assume that most businesses are in the business to sell a product or service or some type. And I guess you want to showcase what you do, whether it can be a physical product, so you can create a video about, and we see this all the time, if you’re going to be, I love gadgets. I love all the new announcements. Did you see the latest Sony a7S III promo video and demonstration video that came out? DGI, who make all the drones, they make some fantastic product videos and that’s the kind of, maybe our listeners, maybe you don’t want to go to that level if you can, if you can create that amazing visual videos, but generally you can make simpler videos.

    Simon Banks:
    Just a simple, this is my product. This is what it does. This is how it works. Or even, if you’re doing a more service based or consultancy, just talk about, this is my process. These are the people I serve. This is how I get results for clients. And I think, what I’m trying to do here is to encourage businesses to think plural, multiple videos, not just the one. And so if you start with the company video, then you can start thinking about, okay, let’s talk about the products and services that we do and let’s showcase them.

    Dane Golden:
    Okay. And everyone’s heard of the testimonial or the case study video. And maybe we know exactly what that video is about. Do you have any things we should shoot for? Meaning what the goal is from one of these videos, other than the obvious?

    Simon Banks:
    I think these videos are gold. This is the gold, this is the kind of video you really, every business needs because you want testimonials. Quite often you’d ask, I don’t know about you, but when I ask for client for testimonial they go, “Yes, yes. We’ll do that.” And they give you a written one, couple of lines, maybe. But they’re so much more effective if you can see them, if you can see the person, real person actually talking about your real products and service. But to get a client on video, this is the hardest part. This is where the gold dust is, is actually trying to get a customer to talk about your product or service on video. That’s the challenge. And quite often, if you say, “Oh, I’m going to have a professional crew come up and video you talking about our service,” most clients would probably go, “Oh, I’m a bit shy.”

    Simon Banks:
    I think a lot of clients overthink this. What you need to do is make it authentic because this is where this is the key here, as authentic as possible. It doesn’t have to be high production values. What I’ve done recently for a client is I got, because you can’t actually, with what’s going on in the world with COVID-19 and all this, sort of can’t sort of go into people’s homes and film them these days. I got a client to say, “Does your client have a smartphone?”

    Dane Golden:
    No, no, they don’t have one.

    Simon Banks:
    Surprise, surprise, they do. What we do is say, “Look, get your client, just send them some questions, just to ask them to video themselves on the smartphone answering your questions and just get them to send you the file and then send it to an editor or wherever you might do to get it edited.” The sound’s not brilliant, video can be a bit shaky, but if they’re saying what a good service it does, people think that’s authentic. They don’t think it’s highly professional and the more authentic and rough and ready it is the more believable it is. It’s as simple as that. And the other thing is, okay, you might think, all right, my clients, that’s a bit hard to ask my clients to do that. The other way of doing it is just get them on a Zoom call and record the Zoom call and just ask them some questions about your service.

    Dane Golden:
    Wow.

    Simon Banks:
    It’s a video. And then you record it. You download it and again, you can just edit it out. Again, Zoom quality is not great, but the important thing is not the video quality. It’s about seeing someone saying what a wonderful service you provide, your product or your service has changed our lives, whatever it might be. That’s the important thing. And the more you, that’s why these video testimonials are gold dust, if you can see the person saying what a great service you provide, it adds so much value.

    Dane Golden:
    Totally, totally authentic. And I just wanted to say there was also I wanted to know about the case study. How is that? Is that a different video? Or there’s a different flavor on the testimonial?

    Simon Banks:
    Yes. To me, a video testimonial to me, someone just literally, it’s a talking head talking to the camera and saying, “My service is Tallboy Communications,” is my video production company saying how, “the team of Tallboy were really good and they’re fantastic to work with and they made some great videos here for us and they really helped us solve to communicate what we needed to our clients. And it’s increased our sales by X amount.”

    Simon Banks:
    The case study tends to be a bit more professionally produced, a bit more behind the scenes where you sort of go in into your client’s offices or wherever they may be and sort of do more behind the scenes. You talk about more about the challenges this client had and how you came up with a solution for them and then what the results were. It’s a bit more of a produced video, which explains, goes through the whole process.

    Renee Teeley:
    I think having people record themselves on their iPhone or doing something through Skype or Zoom, I think that’s actually a really smart way to do tutorials or case studies because on one hand you sort of sacrifice production quality but on the other hand, you may get better answers from your customers because I found that if someone is not used to being on camera, they get really nervous when you have a full production crew in front of them. Or if you have a full lighting kit and a DSLR or whatever type of camera that you use. If you’re not putting that in front of them, you just may get a better performance out of them. I think that’s a really smart way to do that.
    Switching gears a little bit, I know a lot of companies do webinars. And in your book you had some tips about how to use a video from webinars. Can you talk a little bit about that?

    Simon Banks:
    Absolutely. Again, I’m trying to encourage businesses to think video. Now I don’t know about you, but there’s loads of webinars going on at the moment, I get invited to webinars every day of the week. And in terms of where we are in the world with the pandemic, you can’t sort of do events these days and you can’t go and see your clients so a lot of people are putting on webinars. Now, webinars are generally videos. You’re generally going to have someone on camera and then you might be presented to some slides and you might have some guests. The webinars tend to go for I guess, 40 minutes to an hour. You generally will record them. What I’m suggesting to businesses, you’ve got this great piece of content in a form of a webinar, why don’t you edit it into segments, cut it into smaller videos, maybe five minutes, maybe more depending on the content and then repurpose that content for your customers or potential leads.

    Simon Banks:
    And so that’s the whole thing about video these days is not just think a video, but even if you do a corporate video or testimonials, is you just, you cut them into different segments. For example, I got my client to get his customer to talk on video for a video testimonial and the content was so good. They sent me back 17 minutes of material. Rather than do one video, one video client testimonial video, we edited three for them because the content was so good and the clients they’re very good in terms of really happy with the service. The same as with webinar is think about, it’s a long webinar people I feel probably not going to watch a replay for 60 minutes, but if you can just cut it into tighter, maybe just put a new title sequence at the beginning and create a shorter version of a video, which then you can reuse, put onto YouTube or send to your clients.

    Dane Golden:
    Now, you also have a section in your book called educational and training videos. And the first one you listed was the event conference video. And I have to admit, I have at least on YouTube where I do most of my work, I have a pretty negative feeling about a lot of event conference videos. And I’m happy to be disabused of that, but I sort of think that that’s a good option to have on a Wistia or Vidyard or Vimeo player but I try to discourage that on YouTube. What are your thoughts? And what’s the goal of producing a video like that?

    Simon Banks:
    Well, a lot of my business was, I’m going to talk past tense here going to cover events and conferences for clients. And generally again, it’s for like the webinar, you go and record an event or conference, you have all this great content and you just try, as you write, you just try and upload hours and hours of material on onto YouTube and expect people to watch. Hello. It’s probably not going to happen. Don’t know about you but even when I go to a YouTube video if it’s than 10 minutes long, I go, okay, I’ll just come back to that one later. But especially conference stuff can be quite dull. It might be relevant to your audience, but probably not on YouTube. You’re probably right. Let’s use something like Wistia or Vimeo, but again, just cut it up into segments. That’s what I’m actually doing at the moment for a client. They had an event at the end of last year and then we are repurposing their content into smaller segments for them so they have something else they can keep sending to their clients.

    Dane Golden:
    Great.

    Simon Banks:
    And again, with conferences again, it’s not just thinking about, I just want the speakers covered, as in most people want, I want the speaker covered with a couple of cameras, but also get a crew to do behind the scenes. Get some more interesting aspects of an event rather than just the actual speaking content, because realistically, it’s great if you’re there in person and it’s relevant to you, but let’s face it, just putting onto YouTube for an hour or quite often conferences can be all day, I wouldn’t expect very many views on that.

    Renee Teeley:
    No, I wouldn’t expect very many views on that either. I think it’s similar to the webinar videos. You have to be conscious of what’s entertaining for your audience or educational and make sure they’re getting value out of it. But it’s not just long winded and showing the things that people don’t care about. Behind the scenes, great, great tip there. I think that’s one of the benefits of people going in person to conferences is that sort of the behind the scenes kind of stuff. And if you can show that to your audience on YouTube, I think you’re going to be better off for it.

    Dane Golden:
    What do you mean in person conferences? What are they?

    Renee Teeley:
    Because it’s not a thing anymore.

    Simon Banks:
    You remember those days? Remember those days?

    Dane Golden:
    Vaguely. Vaguely.

    Simon Banks:
    Vaguely. I think what I’m seeing is people often treat video is as a broadcast. They think one video is going to appeal to everybody and it’s just not true. You’ve got to make video content for your audience. Don’t think that everyone is going to watch it just because you put it on YouTube doesn’t mean you’re going to find a whole new audience. I blame Kevin Costner. Do you know?

    Renee Teeley:
    Okay, where’s this going?

    Simon Banks:
    You haven’t heard this quote?

    Dane Golden:
    Oh, if you build it, they will come. Or you will come.

    Simon Banks:
    Yeah. Exactly.

    Renee Teeley:
    Oh okay.

    Simon Banks:
    I relate that to videos. For those who don’t know the quote, it’s an eighties film called Field of Dreams where Kevin Costner is in the middle of summer in the Midwest, I guess. He’s a farmer and he hears the voice of God saying, “If you build it, they will come.” He ends up building a baseball pitch in the middle of his cornfield or something and lo to hold these dead baseball people turn up and play baseball. Anyway.

    Renee Teeley:
    Spoiler alert.

    Simon Banks:
    Sorry, spoiler alert.

    Dane Golden:
    Oh, now I can’t see it.

    Simon Banks:
    Wiped that one out. But I translate that to, I see a lot of clients is that if you make it, upload it to YouTube, they will watch, they will come and watch it. And as you guys know.

    Dane Golden:
    Not true.

    Simon Banks:
    Not true. And that’s why one of the reasons I wrote my book because people like, “Oh, I spent $10,000 on my video and upload it to YouTube, I only got a lousy five views.” That’s because they didn’t do anything with it.

    Renee Teeley:
    I guess the alternative title to your book could have been, Kevin Costner Lied to Us.

    Simon Banks:
    Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Maybe that’s a good, that’ll be my second. That’s version two.

    Renee Teeley:
    Follow up.

    Simon Banks:
    Yeah, the follow up.

    Renee Teeley:
    In terms of actually producing videos that grab attention that people do want to see, can you talk a little bit about the public relations video? What is it? What’s the goal? How to be successful with that?

    Simon Banks:
    Yeah. This is something you don’t often see these days. Let’s face it, if you can get on television or radio or in print, if you sort of make the news for the right reasons, not the wrong reasons, but there’s loads of publications out there. Magazines, TV shows, YouTube shows even where you can be invited on as an expert. And so what I’m finding if you’re really clever and I do encourage a lot of my clients who generally larger corporates is that in this day and age, news organizations, they’re 24/7, they’ve got online outlets, they don’t have camera crews floating around just wanting to go to your business to film. Journalists they’re stressed out. They’re always looking for stories.

    Simon Banks:
    As a business, if you’ve got a business that produces, I’ll give you an example at the moment is PPE, personal protection equipment. It’s all in the news over here about lack of personal protection in terms of masks, visors, hand sanitizer. I’ve been helping a company which make these products, is actually you just film what you’re doing. You’re creating what we call B roll. You’re just filming your manufacturing process, whatever it may be. And so when a news organization wants to talk to you about what’s happening with PPE, you can say, “Yes, you can interview me over Skype and I’m going to send you some pictures of my business.”

    Dane Golden:
    That’s great.

    Simon Banks:
    Which will go on the news. It’s not new. This is not new, but no one’s doing it. You’re creating I guess, a press pack in a way, which you just basically have these shots, which you will sent to, you can upload to a Dropbox, or WeTransfer, send it to a news organization. They would download them and the editors will love you for it because they’ve got footage, they’ve got some visuals which will enhance their story.

    Dane Golden:
    And in addition, it’s so much more complicated to travel anywhere now, you’ve really saved the day.

    Simon Banks:
    Absolutely. I don’t know about you, but on the news here, you just see a lot of Skype interviews which are really bad because the cameras are lousy, you’re looking up their nose into the ceiling and you just wish someone would send in some decent footage of what they’re doing.

    Dane Golden:
    Now here’s another type of video and it’s one of my favorites and I think it’s probably never the video that someone comes to you first with, but I think it’s just super valuable, the customer or product support video. Why should a business do a customer or product support video? Or more than one?

    Simon Banks:
    They should do a ton of them because let’s face it, it’s basically what I call the frequently asked question videos. These are simple to do. You don’t, again, need to have high production values. You could probably record them on your webcam or a smartphone. All you’re doing is saying, “What questions do I always get asked?” And so, rather than having someone call you and saying, asking you the question, create a video about it and put it on your website. And so when you’re sending out your product or service, you can just say, “Here’s a link to our support, have a look here first and see if there’s a video that answers your questions. If not, then send us an email or give us a call.” But I think you will save yourself a lot of time and money actually having this video already there, which will answer pretty much, I’m pretty sure that most businesses can work out what top 10 questions they get asked all the time.

    Renee Teeley:
    Yeah. I think that this, having a set of product support and customer support videos is for people who just are new to video, I think it’s overlooked, but I think it’s something that it will save companies a lot of time in answering those questions, but it also just leads to a nice customer experience when especially if someone is new to your product or going through that onboarding process, just having those on demand videos right there for them, it’s just a nice experience. Definitely important part of the video marketing strategy. And this one’s sort of, this type of video kind of layers on top of that a little bit, but can you talk a little bit about the how to video and is that even different from a product support video?

    Simon Banks:
    I think so. Definitely. It depends on what your product is. I think, I guess product support could be, is there a guarantee with this? Or how do I get it serviced? How do I send it in to get repaired? It could be as simple as that. Or it could be a question of it’s not working. And you can just have a process of how you return something. It could be as simple as that. The how to video, which I know is very popular on YouTube is pretty much you have a product or it could be a review and you’re basically going through your product and how it works. Like this is how you turn it on, these are the parts you need to put together to make it work. This is all the features it has. This is the amazing things it can do. This is the end result.

    Simon Banks:
    It’s that sort of stuff. And I think depending again, on your business and what you do in terms of a product, a lot of people might not have a product, but again, you could, if you’re a consultancy or you have a more professional services based, you can still do a, how to video in a way what you can talk about is how your systems and processes work. How do you onboard your clients? How do you work with your clients? Things like that.

    Dane Golden:
    And what about videos? How to, this is I encourage businesses to do this on YouTube, with how to. Just something, a process that they want to show their customers, but it may not have anything to do with their business specifically, for instance, it might be just, if you sell soccer balls, you teach someone how to pass the ball, that type of thing. Do you recommend that as well? Or not as much?

    Simon Banks:
    I think you could do, I guess, best practice as well. Yeah, exactly. You could be, I think the soccer ball is a great example. Rather than doing a how to video in terms of this is how you pump up your ball, this is how you unbox it. But if you can show some drills in terms of passing and shooting and things like that, it would really benefit. And those sort of videos are actually great for lead generation as well. You’re not necessarily selling your product per se, and saying, here it is, isn’t it fantastic? This is what it does. But you’re showing sort of, I guess the benefits of a product. You can have the product in your filming and your shots but you’re not necessarily mentioning it or showing it. You’re showing them the results of it or the benefits of using it.

    Dane Golden:
    And there’s another type of video, the staff training and instruction and safety video. And this sounds so mundane, but I can tell you one of our friends and someone we’re a fan of Tim Schmoyer of Video Creators, actually he was solopreneur, expanding his small business and wanted somebody to edit his videos. He had been editing it. He just shot this several hour tutorial on how he edited his videos and passed that along with the editor. But I’m sure there’s so many more ways to use this type of video. Tell us a little bit more.

    Simon Banks:
    I think, in any business, well, I would say any business serious about growing their business and training their staff, you need to have this sort of content. Yes it can be quite dry, but with the technology now you can make them interesting. I’ve made lots of training videos in my time, we’ve sort of had actors come in and sort of do role play. You can make them quite humorous if it’s appropriate. And I just think even now, even it’s more definitely needed if one’s working remotely, is to have some training videos particularly about how they can perform better from home.

    Simon Banks:
    At the moment I do lecturing at a university. I actually sort of teach students how to make documentaries and we’re talking about, coming back into the universities. You need to have training videos about actually, how do you enter the building? You need to sanitize your hands. You need to wear a mask, things like that. These, I’m surprised that many businesses, aren’t doing this, but you need to show not only your staff, but also your customers, how you’re handling this current situation and how you’re making your either workplace or your place of business or your shop, whatever it may be, how it is actually safe to come and visit.

    Renee Teeley:
    You just said one of my favorite words, which was documentary. I will maybe reach out to you after the podcast to pick your brain about that since it’s on my bucket list to work on a documentary one day and specifically for businesses. Kind of merging a couple of passions together. But yeah, I think using video to train internal staff and helping I think is key right now in remote working environments, but it’s also just helpful normally. It’s kind of that same thing of being able to help your customers and being able to use video for internal training, I think is pretty important. Speaking of employees, so how about employee communication videos? Is that different from staff training? And do you have any tips around employee communication?

    Simon Banks:
    Yes, I think it’s again, it’s always important to communicate with your team and your staff, but it’s even more important now that basically you’re not having the face to face meetings anymore. I did a lot of, still do do a lot of what we call interior communications. And this is just an employee communication video can be quite simple. It’s just the CEO basically saying, “This is how our last quarter went. This is what we need to do. This is what we’re doing well. This is what we need to do better.” Some of it can be, again, what they’re doing for corporate responsibility. I’ve done those sort of videos before to saying, how we’re helping the community. And I think now it’s so important considering your workforce is probably scattered everywhere and working from home, they need to hear from their leaders and their team members to basically say, “This is what we’re doing. This is how we’re doing it. This is what we’re doing really well. This is what we can be doing better.”
    And I think this should be done more in a video form, recorded video form rather than Zoom meetings all the time. I don’t know about you, but I think a lot of people are getting a bit Zoomed out. I think generally.

    Dane Golden:
    What?

    Simon Banks:
    Instead of rather having another meeting on Zoom, you can record quite simply a personal message to your team. You don’t have to have a big production company come in and do it. I’m coaching and training a lot of leaders and business owners how to use their smartphone to record a message, not only for the staff or team members, but also their customers. Generally just say, yeah, some of them just saying it’s business as usual, we’re still open for business. This is how you reach me now. Or again, you can send what I call a personal video. This is not a video which you might put on YouTube or Wistia, or on LinkedIn or social media. This is a video which you are recording one to one. You’re just saying, I could say, “Hey Dane, it’s Simon. Thank you so much for having you on my podcast. It was a great show. Thank you. And here’s some tips and here’s a copy of my book.”

    Simon Banks:
    And you can use, there’s lots of apps that you can use. One is called Loom, loom.com. It’s a free app. It’s a Chrome plugin where you can record your web camera and you record your screen. And you can just, I’ve just did one today to a supplier I’m working with and we’re talking about my website. I’m just saying, “This is some feedback on my website. This are the changes that I want.” And you just send them a link in an email. And when they open it, it tells you they opened it and watch the video. For a lot of people, video doesn’t necessarily need to be one to many. It’s very effective if you can do one to one.

    Dane Golden:
    Fantastic, this is great stuff. Simon Banks, how can people find out more about you and your company Tallboy Communications and the book, How to Get Video Right?

    Simon Banks:
    My business production website is called Tallboy T-A-L-L-B-O-Y.co.uk. If you want to spend lots of money with me making a video, please come and contact me. But I also have another website called How to Get Video Right, and it’s getvideoright.com. And this is sort of I guess my training website. This is where I want to educate, encourage champion business owners and marketers in using video. And it’s not just about making videos, but it’s to make sure that they have a strategy behind them and to ultimately make sure they’re successful in reaching their goals, whatever those goals may be. For most people it’s about I want to build my audience and grow my business. And that’s what the Get Video Right website is about, is to help business owners and marketers do this.

    Dane Golden:
    Excellent. Thank you, Simon Banks. My name is Dane Golden with my cohost, she’s R-E-N-E-E T-E-E-L-E-Y, Renee Teeley. And we want to thank you the listener for joining us today, right, Renee?

    Renee Teeley:
    Yes, absolutely. And today I want to leave you with a quote, as I once told my good friend Dolly Parton.

    Dane Golden:
    Oh come on.

    Renee Teeley:
    You don’t like Dolly Parton?

    Dane Golden:
    Go on, go on.

    Renee Teeley:
    As I once told my good friend Dolly Parton, “The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain.” There may be some things along the way to success, but stay the course on your journey on the way to get there.

    Dane Golden:
    I just love trying to throw you off during your quotes. And I want to invite you to the listener to review us on Apple Podcasts and you can share us and let us know on social media how you like the Video Marketing Value podcast. Renee and I do this podcast and our various other YouTube videos and projects and clients because we love helping marketers and business owners just like you do YouTube and video marketing better. Thanks to our special guest Simon Banks. Thank you, Simon.

    Simon Banks:
    Thank you very much. Thanks for having me. Been great show. Thank you.

    Dane Golden:
    Until next week, here’s to helping you help your customers through video.

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