Hector Garcia CPA And YouTube Success As An Accountant

Last updated on June 15th, 2024

Hector Garcia is a CPA and one of the top accountants on YouTube where he shares his expertise. On the show today he tells us why he gives expert advice for free on YouTube

GUEST: Hector Garcia | hectorgarcia.com | YouTube |  Linkedin | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook  

Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify

HOST: The VidAction Podcast is hosted by:
– Dane Golden of VidAction.tv and VidTarget.io | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube
– Renee Teeley of VideoExplained and ReneeTeeley.com | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

SPONSORS: This episode is brought to you by our affiliate partners, including: TubeBuddyVidIQMorningFameRev.com, and other products and services we recommend.

PRODUCER: Jason Perrier of Phizzy Studios

TRANSCRIPT

Hector Garcia:
In order to own your knowledge, you must give it away. Knowledge is really worth nothing, while it’s sitting in your head. It’s kind of like money, right? So if you’ve got money in your pocket and it’s in your pocket for the rest of your life, that money has intrinsic value, but it’s got no market value because you can’t use it and knowledge, it kind of works the same way. If you cannot use it, exchange it, transfer it, teach it, if no one knows that you know it, then what’s the purpose of having that knowledge.

Dane Golden:
It’s time for the VidAction Podcast. This is the podcast where we help marketers and business owners just like get more value out of your video marketing efforts. My name is Dane Golden from VidAction.tv, where we help you up your game on YouTube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers. And my other business is VidTarget.io, where we help you save time and money through more targeted YouTube ads.
My cohost Renee Teeley is on assignment today, but we do want to remind you the listener that you should always check the description, the show notes just below attached to this podcast on your app, because we got a lot of good info for you. And today we have a special guest. It’s Hector Garcia, CPA. He’s the top accountant about QuickBooks on YouTube. Welcome Hector.

Hector Garcia:
Hey Dane, how are you? Excited to be here.

Dane Golden:
I am excited to have you. We asked you on the VidAction Podcast today because you are the leader in your field on YouTube, humble as you are. And you got there by sharing your expertise for free in the QuickBooks space. Now this is something you get paid a lot of money for, to be an accountant, and yet you give away your expertise for free. I just think that’s very interesting. Is this a good topic to talk about today?

Hector Garcia:
Yeah, that would be great. One thing that I learned from someone a long time ago, that kind of marked me for life, which is, in order to own your knowledge, you must give it away. In other words, knowledge is really worth nothing, while it’s sitting in your head. It’s kind of like money, right? So if you’ve got money in your pocket and it’s in your pocket for the rest of your life, that money has intrinsic value, but it’s got no market value because you can’t use it and knowledge, it kind of works the same way. If you cannot use it, exchange it, transfer it, teach it, whatever, if no one knows that you know it, then what’s the purpose of having that knowledge.

Hector Garcia:
So I found that YouTube is a perfect platform for me to quote, showcase that knowledge, even though, like you said, I’m shooting myself in the foot, I’m giving away the stuff that people usually pay big bucks to have someone else do. But what ends up happening is people start identifying you as the expert and maybe they don’t rely on you for the easy stuff, because I taught them how to do it because they learned from me, but then they start relying you on the hard stuff. And hard is a code word for more valuable stuff that you can charge more money for. So if you want to be known as an expert in your field, the easiest way to do that is to prove it by doing it. And then unfortunately that will require spending some non-billable time creating content and giving it away for free, but it absolutely pays back when those higher level clients want to involve you in those higher level engagements.

Dane Golden:
You said like several really great things there, particularly just about knowledge isn’t valuable unless you’d give it away or share it or teach it, but also I think it’s really interesting that you say you’re doing non-billable time and that’s how, I think a lot of businesses think, well is every hour something that I’m doing, that’s bringing in a hour of revenue right now? And have you found that spending an hour where you’re not technically getting paid is less valuable, more valuable, same value? How would you value that hour?

Hector Garcia:
Yeah, that’s interesting. So particularly in my profession, accounting, but in any profession or services profession, such as engineering, architecture, law, it’s very traditional that the consultants or the professionals charge by the hour. So the client calls and says, “Hey, I need help with a tax return. I need help with drafting a contract. I need help for you to design my house,” whatever the help the request is, and usually the professional answers back, “Sure. I charge $300 an hour.”

Hector Garcia:
Now, first of all, charging by the hour, it’s an extremely negative customer interaction, and that could be a topic for an entire different podcast, which is transitioning from a time-based billing to a value based type billing. However, if you actually buy into the whole concept of charging by the hour, you can view the trajectory or the history of most professionals, and you got a recently graduated 20 something year old professional. They’re going to be charging 75 to $100 an hour. That’s kind of the ongoing rate for most professionals that I mentioned in the example. Then compared to someone with 30 years of experience, some gray hair, some proven jobs that have big names behind them and big clients behind them, you’re going to see them charging 300, 400, $500 an hour.
So one thing that is for sure is that people value your experience over time, and if you can prove you know what you’re doing, you can effectively increase your hourly rate. So if you’re a professional charging by the hour, obviously you would love to stay young, but fast forward to a time in the future where you can charge triple or quadruple of what you’re paying now. So the shortcut, in my opinion, the shortcut to getting to those higher rates is to kind of fast forward the perceived experience that you have in the marketplace. If you have a 25 year old accountant walking into a prospect versus a, say, 60 year old accountant walk into the prospect, that prospect could make certain implications that the 60 year old has more experience.

Hector Garcia:
However, if the 25 year old has a YouTube channel and it has particular videos explaining how to fix a specific problem that a specific client’s industry have, and you got the other person that doesn’t, the age at this point, doesn’t really matter because people no longer need to see age as implied experience. They can see your YouTube channel as implied experience. [crosstalk 00:07:17] The way I try to convince my colleagues and other accounting professionals or any professionals at all, is that YouTube essentially is your new business card. YouTube is the new building high rise in downtown. A YouTube channel where you can consistently lay out the case that you know what you’re doing, is worth more than anything else that’s traditionally valued in their accounting professions specifically.

Dane Golden:
Let me ask you this, Hector, let me ask you this because this is something that I think a lot about. For someone like you, who shares an expensive expertise for free, something that you already charge for and you share it with whoever shows up, right? When you have a customer who watches that video, most likely there’s going to be a lot of people who, even though you’ve shown them exactly how to do something, they may want to hire you to do that exact thing for them, even though you’ve shown them for free, because maybe it’s an important thing, they don’t want to get wrong either. Maybe they want somebody who’d do it a 100% right, instead of them that might do 90% right. It’s that valuable, or just in general, they don’t necessarily want to know how to do it themselves. They want to know that you know how to do it, and that’s how you demonstrate it.

Hector Garcia:
That’s a great point. There’s actually multiple layers of psychology in play here, and me as consumer, I’ve been in the same circumstance, right? I want to do something on my own. I want to take care of it myself, whatever it is. I go to YouTube and I watch one of these, how-to videos, whether it’s something related to my profession or something around the house, it really doesn’t matter. In some cases, I would go through the video. Let’s just break it down into three cases, right?

Hector Garcia:
So case number one, I go through the video. The video was great. I was able to do it. I was able to achieve my task. At that point, the YouTuber doesn’t really make anything more than the ads per se. However, that person has just placed one seed of good will into a potential consumer, that maybe wants to do the next job that definitely they can’t do it on their own. So that’s reason number one, why you want to show somebody how to do it, because you create good will for a second or a third more complex project down the road.

Hector Garcia:
The second reason I would say is because a lot of people are do-it-yourself first, and it isn’t until they try to do it themselves, that they don’t understand that, that cannot be done by the layman that you actually need an expert or a professional to do so. So sometimes, the video is a foot in the door for people that are going to attempt to do it themselves, and then they realize that this is way too difficult to complete. If you did a good job at explaining it, that you didn’t do it in a sale-sy gimmicky way, because there’s a lot of YouTubers that show enough so people screw things, [crosstalk 00:10:25] and then force them into the framework that now they’re screwed. They made the hole already, now they got to get somebody to patch it up. And some YouTubers do that, some content creators in general, do that. They do partial content that thesis up to some paid content or some informational product, but that’s not my policy.
My policy is I will do it as if you’ve paid me to create a video for me to help you do it on your own. And I know that the masses are not going to bite, but there’s going to be a small percentage, and usually these are the highest net worth type clients that tried themselves and they realized, “You know what? I got more money than time. I prefer to spend money and get the expert to do it,” and you have that good will in place.

Hector Garcia:
And as you say, the third one, where someone is actually shopping around for a professional or an expert, and they’re going to watch the video to watch you at work just so they can evaluate or get a preview of what it will be like to work with you. Especially when it comes to pricing specifically, and I’m a student of pricing and obviously I’m a big advocate for pricing based on the value you provide, not based on your effort. Whenever you-

Dane Golden:
I’m sorry. I want to interrupt you there because not a lot of people understand that difference. It may be elemental to you, elementary but could I sum up? Am I correct in summing up that you say pricing per time for value. Pricing per time is if you say I charge X hundred dollars an hour for doing work. Pricing for value saying, if I’m going to save you a $100,000 by making sure you follow this tax break, this service may be worth $10,000 to you, even if it only takes me 15 minutes to do.

Hector Garcia:
That’s correct, for a couple of reasons. One is usually when people want to find out how long something takes when they ask you, “Hey, how long will it take you to do this?” That’s code for, “Hey, once I know your hourly rate, I want to predict how much it’s going to cost me for you to do that.” People are preconditioned to assume that professionals always charge by the hour, because statistically speaking, a great majority of them do.
However, many professionals, accountants, lawyers, just consultants in general, they leave a lot of money on the table because they don’t really know at the end of the day, how much value or how much impact your work does for the client. And if you are a smart professional, you want to take the best possible clients, and the way you filter out the ones that are not the best possible clients is to identify the ones that actually are able to identify the type of value you can bring into the table.

Hector Garcia:
I’ll give you an example. You are a YouTube consultant and somebody comes to you and says, “Hey, could you evaluate my channel analytics, and kind of tell me if I’m on the right track.” Now, if you were charging by the hour, you would say, “Sure, it’ll take me two or three hours, and I’ll give you let’s say, a full assessment.” Now, you’re going to do a great piece of work for me, and then basically, you and I agreed on a price based on time and done.
However, if you don’t ask, “Hey, let me ask you a question. What is the value of that analysis?” If that analysis was able to give you some great insight, like it potentially double, triple, quadruple your channel, what will your earnings look like at the end? And now you get the customer engaged into not the thing that they thought was going to solve the problem, but the problem in itself, the pain point in itself. Then instead of charging for three hours of analyzing a channel, you can charge for a complete solution to charge for a percentage of the growth you can bring to that channel.
So you prefer to get 20% of everything I grow in that channel, and I also prefer to pay you 20% for the channel growth, because I’m getting certainty that what you’re actually doing for me, is not a cost. It’s an investment into future growth and profits we can share together.

Dane Golden:
Wow.

Hector Garcia:
So when a professional focuses on bringing value into the table, you become the customer’s partner and you can essentially get a lot more bank for the buck as a professional focusing on that mindset.

Dane Golden:
I think you just opened a lot of eyes here for our listeners, with these knowledge bombs you’re dropping here. You just made people a lot of money and people … If you’re listening to this on your podcast app, I would rewind and listen to that part again, because this is really good. Let’s talk a little bit about more tactical things that you do on YouTube. So what types of videos do you do? What types of topics? Do you do livestreams, short tutorials, anything in between? What do you do?

Hector Garcia:
Okay. That’s a lot. So-

Dane Golden:
Well we don’t need to know everything. We just want to know an overview.

Hector Garcia:
I’ll give you, from a high level of strategy. So from a high level strategy, I would love to have a channel that has at least two videos a week, and I would say that’s without really getting into the details of how long the video is and what it is, but I would love my channel to be active enough, so subscribers feel that during the week, they have options to at least watch one video. The specific content that I do is accounting tutorials. These are do-it-yourself, accounting tutorials. For the most part, you’re going to see content on showing people how to solve a particular problem using QuickBooks. QuickBooks is my weapon of choice. It’s my specialty. I’ve made it my career basically to be an expert in QuickBooks, showcase that.

Hector Garcia:
Now I do training as a professional. People hired me after watching a video and say, “Great, I saw your video. I need level two, I need part two, which is I need to pick your brain about how some of these particular situations adapt to me, my problem, my business. I get the core, I get the gist of the stuff that you taught, but I have one specific transaction that I don’t know whether it’s compatible or not with the explanation that you gave me.” So that’s what I charge for, right? I give away my knowledge, but I charge for my expertise, and that’s the whole thing. Give away my knowledge, charge for my expertise. What’s in my head is going to be for free on YouTube. How do I put what’s in my head to your problem? That’s what I charged the big bucks for. So in that sense-

Dane Golden:
Can I stop you there and ask you.

Hector Garcia:
Yeah.

Dane Golden:
When you say you give away your knowledge, you charge for expertise. Sometimes I say this and I’m not sure if it’s entirely correct, but I say you give away the tactics, you charge for the strategy. Is that a good way of thinking about it?

Hector Garcia:
I think it’s a good way of thinking about it, but I think you can flip the script as well, right? So, if I tell you, this is how you do a journal entry, or this is a transaction in accounting. That’s how you do a journal entry, that’s called a tactic, right? Someone might be looking at the video, how to do a journal entry, but then they realize, “Huh, if my situation required a journal entry, that would be a strategy,” correct? But there are some videos … So very interesting, in some cases, my videos are strategic and in some cases they are tactical. Based on the client’s circumstance, one video could give away the tactic, but require a backend strategy to make sure that it can basically back into that tactic. Or in other cases, I give away strategic framework and people say, “That’s awesome. I definitely want to create an LOC, whatever it is, but I want to tell you my situation, so I can know how that affects for me on my taxes.”

Hector Garcia:
So it’s not necessarily one or the other. In some cases it could be one and it’s a stepping stone for the other. And in some cases you give both the strategy and the tactic, and then someone will say, “That’s great. I want to adopt that, but I still want to pick your brain about whether or not this is the right thing for me.” So in many cases, there might be a third layer here that’s beyond tactic or beyond strategy, which is, “Hey, I want your judgment,” right? Because see, most people think that everything is about strategy or tactics, and this is how it is. That’s true. Strategy is the plan, tactics is the execution, but sometimes you need someone just judgment. I want someone to look at this and just let me know whether I’m looking at it correctly, right?

Dane Golden:
Right.

Hector Garcia:
Does this even make sense for me? So, in many cases and not just limited to those two.

Dane Golden:
Wow. I mean, this is really great stuff. I’m sure you know this, but really great stuff. Let me ask you, when you do videos, how do you decide … Well, we didn’t really say that you … Do a lot of what you do is livestreams and sometimes you do shorter …

Hector Garcia:
Pre-recorded, yeah. So most of the stuff I do is pre-recorded, and I think one of the things I’m going to recommend your listeners here, especially if there are in the professional services’ realm, where they’re dealing with different types of clients, different situations, solving different problems. Most people especially, let’s say consultants or experts in a particular field, they’re not just laboring, right? They’re actually solving problems. In many cases, they don’t know the scope of the problem or the value of the problem, as we’d mentioned earlier. However, every day we all, learn like each of us. You Dane, I Hector, we all learn something new, and in many cases, these learnings basically stay in the back of our head, in our, let’s call it, our permanent hard drive.

Dane Golden:
Right.

Hector Garcia:
Some people do a great job at journaling, right? They go in their notebook and they write it down and say, “This is what I learned today,” and that’s great, but what I do is I take it to the next level. I will not ever let a week go by that I learned something and I didn’t put it in video. Like to me, it would be a tremendous waste of an opportunity for me not to take that new learning, and convert it into a permanent archive for the world to access. Because what ends up happening is, as I’m learning, I’m also solidifying my learning because this is my sort of my catharsis, right? So instead of just keeping it in my head, I’m kind of creating an avenue for me to just kind of let it go, and also when you teach something, you learn something twice.

Hector Garcia:
Every time you teach something, you learn something twice and you could never teach something that you didn’t learn completely. So if you want to solidify any learning, you go back out there and teach it. And if you’re teaching it to the mirror, might as well teach it to a camera, teach it to your laptop and make it into a video. Even if you don’t publish it and make it alive, record it for your kids, for your next employees. Record it for the future, who know? You might go back and watch something you learned two or three years ago, and not have to sort of relearn it, right?

Hector Garcia:
So I think that especially problem-solving professionals or people that that’s their job, that’s the value they create for their customers, solve a problem, whatever it is, they have this opportunity to create this permanent archive of what they’re learning and bring others along with that journey. And when you do that, you become a leader and people revere the leader. People buy anything from the leader. When I monetize my channel, which is just beyond just Google Ads, I monetize my channel by getting clients that want to work with me or getting colleagues, competitors that want to buy my products.

Hector Garcia:
So I found it that I can appeal to small business owners, my target clients and I can also appeal to the CPA down the street that says, “Wow, you built a template for that? If I buy the template of you, I can save time.” So that’s the concept. The concept is you want to kind of be the leader in your industry, so you don’t only get customer followers, but you get colleague followers and these colleagues lift you up, they send you referrals. Once they know that you’re not just a leader, but you’re also a specialist in one particular niche, they will send you clients as well. So it’s like a win-win, win-win scenario, when you do something like that.

Dane Golden:
I love that a win-win, win-win scenario. So, what I hear you saying is that, it’s the topic and the method of sharing it on video. It’s not so important the length, or if it’s live, or if it’s pre-recorded. It’s if something that you’ve learned that you just feel you must share, because it’s fascinating, you feel it’s going to help other people and you want to make sure you know it yourself.

Hector Garcia:
Exactly.

Dane Golden:
Okay. Then on top of that, you also mentioned that, and I’ve heard this happen with a lot of other types of YouTube channels that are businesses. And it’s happened for me is that by sharing your expertise, you not only build a network of customers that are loyal to you, but you build a network of colleagues who feel, they know you better because they’ve seen you on video and you’ve been sharing your expertise with them seemingly personally, through video.

Hector Garcia:
Right. I mean, you’ll be amazed when I go to the big accounting conferences that are QuickBooks centric, how many people pull me over to the side, want to take a selfie with me. I’m like in the accounting world a rockstar, which is kind of funny, I know, and it seems like a funny thing to say, but the reality is that whenever you can touch somebody’s heart, or help somebody else make money, because if you help somebody do something on their own, they’re either making money by being able to use this skill in a productive manner, or they’re saving their money and not having to pay somebody to do it.

Hector Garcia:
So showing somebody how to do something is an economic help, right? It’s like a direct economic impact you’re having on someone. And when you have a direct economic impact on someone, that person’s going to appreciate you for life. Beyond that, there’s also a spiritual and just different ways to help someone, but when you show somebody how to do something, it’s like the, “Teach a man how to fish, he will eat forever. Give a man a fish …” It’s exactly that concept. So you want to put yourself in the position, you want to wedge yourself in the position where people don’t just see you as a YouTuber. They see you as sort of a life partner, that’s kind of helping you along, whether it’s economically or spiritually, or inspiring somebody to do something that they didn’t know, they could do themselves, or they lack the confidence to do it.

Hector Garcia:
I mean, you see that with kids. I got four kids, so I can tell you first hand. The face that a kid makes when they’re able to make something that they keep trying over and over and over, it’s a priceless thing to watch, and that stuff translates to adults as well, right? Because giving somebody the self confidence that they didn’t know they had, or giving somebody the tools to be able to confirm that they are a capable human being, that there’s things inside of them, that they didn’t know they had. It’s just a great experience, and again, for both people.

Hector Garcia:
In many ways, I don’t get to see it because I’m staring at a camera, but I see it in the YouTube comments. And when you see people say, “Thank you, that was helpful. Thank you, that saved me time. Thank you, that was productive. Thank you, I’m a better person because of what you did or what you’re doing for me,” that has to be the way, the currency in which, you know you’re doing something right. And then if you do that enough times, you don’t have to make much effort. The economics play themselves out because people will never allow a resource like yours to go under.

Hector Garcia:
See what happened with Khan Academy. Okay, you have Salman Khan can create this incredible database of videos for kids for free, and it came a point in time where producing and keeping this resource, was going to be way too expensive for Salman Khan, so he would have to sell it or take a commercial. What did Bill Gates do? He says, “You know what? You’re getting funding for life because this resource is worth keeping it for the world, for the sake of the world.” And if you can build a channel that has that level of inspiration … I don’t want to assume that my channel is at that level, but that is what I think about every day when I create a new video.

Hector Garcia:
I think as if my channel is designed to change the world, and when you do that, the economics play themselves out. That’s why I’m a big advocate of value and pricing, because once you build this humongous asset, this humongous good will, then it will be kind of dumb really to charge based on effort because your effort means something a lot more than your time. Your effort has all these kind of feelings built into it, good will built into it and value, right? It’s got all this value built into it and charging for your effort at that point, it’s just completely useless. That’s why I kind of tie the concepts of the value you create in the world, the value you provide for your clients and getting paid for what you’re worth, because if you can’t get paid, what you’re worth, you cannot sustain the business.

Hector Garcia:
I literally blocked myself out of the calendar, 15 to 20 hours a week, that I would otherwise, if I was a traditional accountant, spend it doing billable time, but I spend this 15 to 20 hours researching, reading, podcasting, creating content, writing. So that the 20 to 25 hours a week that I do work, I can charge triple, quadruple, whatever everybody else can charge, and it’s still a win-win. I’m improving myself as a professional. Being a YouTuber is a great way to be a better person. You learn how to do public speaking. You confirm your learnings. You become a leader. You have more friends. I have so many people that … I mean I know it’s funny, but they want to be my friend because they want to be associated with a brand that creates good will. So all in all-

Dane Golden:
I’m one of them. I’m one of them. I want to be your friend the same way.

Hector Garcia:
Yeah. So all in all, it’s just like starting a YouTube channel, building a YouTube channel and focusing on helping others, it’s the only formula I know. I’m not saying there isn’t others, the only formula I know where so many people win at the same time.

Dane Golden:
Wow. How do I put this? It’s very moving what you said, because you’re not just talking about how to do YouTube or how to make money, but how to add value to the world while you’re doing it. It’s very touching.

Hector Garcia:
Correct.

Dane Golden:
Let me ask you more on a product level, when you say they buy your products. So you have the channel, and then when you say they buy your products. What do you mean by products?

Hector Garcia:
Okay. So, well of course hiring me or someone from my firm to do a consulting or accounting, that would be one form of product, the most traditional one.

Dane Golden:
And you would bring in customers from anywhere in the country, right? I mean-

Hector Garcia:
Anywhere in the world, anywhere in the world.

Dane Golden:
Wow, okay.

Hector Garcia:
Yeah, we have clients from all over the world, as long as they use QuickBooks and they want to learn how to use their software, to maintain their own accounting, they’re a potential client of ours.

Dane Golden:
All right.

Hector Garcia:
We also create products like templates and shortcuts. So, when you use a particular software for enough time, you will see opportunities where, “Hey, the software doesn’t do this. The software can’t do that. If I had a template or I could start with a template, I would save tons of time.” We have things like something called a chart of accounts. So a chart of accounts is a list of categories that you need to have, so when the transactions come in, you categorize them. I realized after so many years of doing this, that people struggle getting that initial chart of accounts started, and they’ll pay an accountant two, three, $400, so they can sit down with him and understand how that works.

Hector Garcia:
So I figured, “Wait, why don’t I just build a perfect standard chart of accounts for a first time user, sell it for $50 and tell people, “Hey, before you hire an accountant, try my chart of accounts, and maybe you only need to do a couple of tweaks. And if you want to get me involved, get me involved for like a half an hour call, or maybe even just email me the question and I answer it at no cost, and you don’t have to pay someone to build a full, customized chart of accounts, because I got these things that’s 90% of the way there.” So, basically templates, shortcuts, things that I found that most people are building from scratch. That’s the type of products that we sell.

Dane Golden:
Wow. You know Hector, that’s a lot of amazing stuff here, and frankly, just as I told you when we met and we’ve talked a couple of times, I like to think of your service as a really good one, because as someone who is sort of frustrated by accounting and anything related to QuickBooks, for me, it’s like, “Oh, that’s a boring type of stuff. That’s boring.” And to anyone who has a problem, like how to make a proper deduction or how to account for a major expense, that problem is the most interesting problem in the world right now, am I right?

Hector Garcia:
Sure, but I think, that comes from the concept of assuming that everything that’s boring is not valuable, right? I mean, if you sit through an open heart surgery the last 13 hours, most of the stuff is pretty procedural, like watching that person breathe. However, you’re literally saving somebody’s life. You’re literally taking the most precious resource in the world, which is somebody’s life and you’re giving it back to them or you’re allowing them to keep it. So just because something is long, tedious and boring, it doesn’t mean it’s not valuable and someone needs to do that work, right? And the person that does that work, turns out to be in many cases, the hero.

Hector Garcia:
Now I know doing accounting is not being a hero. Being in the front lines, in the medical world, that’s being a hero. I understand that when I equate one thing to the other, but the person that has the patience to endure and persevere and go through all the trials and tribulations to get it done right, and not keep that in the back of their head, like you’re sort of like under the sleeve. “This is my Trump card. I don’t want to give it away. You got to pay me the big bucks to give it away.” Instead, just kind of flip the script and say, “Look, all these boring and tedious things that you don’t want to learn, I’ll put them out there.” Then there’s always going to be someone that says, “You know what? I want to be a person that goes down the journey and does the boring stuff,” and that might be for a limited amount of people that want to go through all of that.

Hector Garcia:
And like you said, some people will watch the video. It’s an hour long. 50 minutes in, and they’re like, “Oh, screw it. I prefer to spend my time doing what I’m passionate at, and I’ll hire somebody else to do it, but it took that first step to try to do it himself, to try to go to the long boring thing and get it done. So someone’s got to do it, whatever profession you’re in. If somebody else finds it boring, who cares? Just put it out there. Put it out there to the world, and you’re going to attract like-minded boring people like you. And if you want to call accountants boring, I’m okay with that. I’ll wear the badge of honor, but I solve real problems and I help people keep more of their money and I help people make more money, and I’m proud of that, and that’s why I do what I do.

Dane Golden:
Yeah, and I say that facetiously, of course, to make a point, but what you’ve really succeeded in doing in your business and frankly, on this podcast today, is you’ve taken something that is very, very methodical and meticulous, and you’ve turned it into something that’s really inspiring and it’s not only going to make people money, but particularly in this day and time, you’re going to keep a lot of people in business, I think. And there’s nothing more valuable than that than being able to support yourself and your family and just keep the economy going. Hector Garcia, CPA, how can people find out about you and your YouTube channel?

Hector Garcia:
Okay. My YouTube channel is called Hector Garcia, CPA, exactly as you mentioned. You can literally just search that and I should be the only one there. My channel is almost at a 100,000 subscribers. Maybe by the time you publish the video, we’ll hit a 100,000 mark and get the play button and throw the play button party, right.

Dane Golden:
All right [crosstalk 00:36:00].

Hector Garcia:
Go to hectorgarcia.com, and I have information about my accounting services and my practice, and some of the stuff that we talked about. I do publish some of my ideas about creating value and adding value to the world and pricing based on value. That’s stuff I also kind of talk about, on top of the QuickBooks stuff and the accounting stuff, and you can find some of that stuff in my website.

Dane Golden:
And I want to invite you the listener to, hey, reach out to on Twitter. My Twitter account is Dane Golden, D-A-N-E G-O-L-D-E-N. Tell me if you have a question or if you like the podcast. Renee Teeley and I do this podcast and our various other YouTube videos and other projects, because we love helping marketers and business owners, just like you, do YouTube better and video marketing better. Thanks to our special guest, Hector Garcia. Thank you, Hector.

Hector Garcia:
You’re welcome Dane, it was a pleasure.

Dane Golden:
Until next week, here’s to helping you help your customers through video.

This post may contain affiliate links.

Scroll to Top