Video Marketing Tips For Pinterest And TikTok With Leslie Morgan of The Candidly

Last updated on June 15th, 2024

Leslie Morgan is a consultant to creators and high profile talent and the general manager of The Candidly. Leslie gives us the reasons why marketers shouldn’t ignore Pinterest and TikTok.

GUEST: Leslie Morgan The Candidly | Twitter | LinkedIn

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HOSTS: The VidAction Podcast is hosted by:
– Dane Golden of VidAction.tv and VidTarget.io | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube
– Gwen Miller  LinkedIn | Twitter |

SPONSORS: This episode is brought to you by our affiliate partners, including: TubeBuddyVidIQMorningFameRev.com, and other products and services we recommend.

PRODUCER: Jason Perrier of Phizzy Studios

TRANSCRIPT

Leslie Morgan:
Five six years ago when Tik TOK was musically and I was very bullish about it then, and I still am. And then Pinterest, I think they’re really moving pretty diligently to, to kind of capitalize on a younger demographic. They certainly are moving very robustly in the creator space and brands are starting to really notice that. So those are the two platforms that I think are really important from a video marketing standpoint.

Dane Golden:
It’s time for the VidAction Podcast. This is the podcast where we help marketers and business owners just like you get more value out of your video marketing efforts. My name is Dane Golden from VidAction.tv, where we help you up your game on YouTube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers, and VidTarget.io, where we help you get higher return on your YouTube ad spend with targeted YouTube placement lists. Along with my co-host, it’s Gwen Miller. Hello, Gwen.

Gwen Miller:
Hey Dane, it’s always a great day to chat video marketing with you.

Dane Golden:
It is. And Gwen, what do you do?

Gwen Miller:
So I work with creatives and brands to use data to craft increasingly better and better videos for their unique, one of a kind audiences. And we’ve never in the history of content, Dane, had so much communication with our audience, both verbal and through the proof of their actions that we see in the data. And we can use that communication to make the experience better for our audiences, and we should be doing it. And that’s what I’m here to do.

Dane Golden:
And we can with your help. And for you, the listener, you should know that, as always, you can follow along in the podcast app you’re listening to right now with the transcript and the links. And today we have a special guest. It’s Leslie Morgan. She’s a consultant to creators and high profile talent, and she’s the general manager of Candidly. Welcome, Leslie.

Leslie Morgan:
Thanks so much. Pleasure to be here. I appreciate you having me.

Gwen Miller:
So fun story. Leslie actually used to be my boss.

Dane Golden:
What?

Gwen Miller:
So we work on a… Yes, yes. This is my old boss that I’ve conned into being on our little podcast, Dane. So yeah, we worked together on a woman’s lifestyle network. It was called ICON, which was a joint venture between mega production company, Endemol Shine, and then OGB YouTuber and entrepreneur Michelle Phan.

Dane Golden:
Absolutely. Yeah.

Gwen Miller:
So I’m excited to have her here because that is in a digital age so many years ago, but she just got so much insights. And since that experience, she’s consulted with all sorts of businesses and creators and high profile talent, as well as you’ve started your own brands, Leslie. I love to hear a little bit about what The Candidly is.

Leslie Morgan:
Yeah. So obviously you just mentioned it. I mean, I’ve got a lot of experience in the lifestyle space. And was working with Michelle and others to create a pretty large digital lifestyle network. So I kind of took that experience and moved it to creating an editorial brand for women 35-plus. We’re considering ourselves, a wellness brand for women who sort of hate wellness brands because wellness feels very affluent, it feels inaccessible. And we’re trying to make it grounded, accessible, something for women who are skeptical, yet curious.

Gwen Miller:
I love that. I think that sounds very needed.

Leslie Morgan:
Thanks.

Gwen Miller:
And because of all this, when Dane and I have been talking for a while, both him and I, our comfort zone is really YouTube. That’s what our background is in. We know a lot about video marketing on YouTube. And yes, we know about video marketing on other platforms. But when we start talking about who could we bring in who can really talk about these other platforms from the perspective of, if you’re just looking at where should I be getting into video marketing? What other places than YouTube should we be looking at?
And you definitely came to mind just because of all your experience consulting with so many varied types of creators and businesses that I felt that you would have kind of the inside scoop on a lot of this stuff. And I think when you and I started talking about this, I think it became very clear that there’s two platforms that you’re very passionate about, and I agree with you, are really up and coming. One which is, I think, already up and come, but is so new that I just think that businesses haven’t really totally gotten their head around them. And another one which I think that people have been sleeping on for many, many years. And so what are those two platforms, Leslie?

Leslie Morgan:
So they are Pinterest and TikTok. And I think with TikTok, especially, I mean, obviously there’s been a lot of traction, but as you may remember, Gwen, TikToK previously was Musical.ly. And during our time together, I was encouraging the team to learn about that platform because I think some platforms that are emerging, I won’t mention them on this podcast, but there’s a hesitancy to maybe jump in so quickly. But once you see the traction and once you start to see some momentum, there’s things to kind of, I think, to challenge yourself as both a brand and a consumer to begin to really dig into learning about those platforms. And so, I mean, this was five, six years ago when TikToK was Musical.ly and I was very bullish about it then, and I still am.
And then Pinterest. I think they’re really moving pretty diligently to kind of capitalize on a younger demographic. They certainly are moving very robustly in the creator space, and brands are starting to really notice that. So those are the two platforms that I think are really important from a video marketing standpoint that we started to talk about.

Dane Golden:
And with Pinterest in particular, it’s a platform that it’s sometimes not on the top of mind on a lot of people when they’re talking about social media, and particularly social video. And on the video front, why should you not ignore Pinterest?

Leslie Morgan:
Because as a platform, they’re going hard into it. So originally Pinterest was, I think, a really great tool. I mean, I used it for my wedding planning, right? And you still think of it that way. It’s a very, hands-on DIY kind of platform. But more recently they’ve really kind of gone all in to develop tools inside the platform to create video content. They’re, from an algorithm perspective, really starting to say, “Hey, if you do video, we’re going to shine a light on that.” And they they’ve developed what’s called a Story Pin. So incorporating video and static imagery, similar to what I would consider with Instagram stories. The differentiating factor is it doesn’t go away. And so there’s a huge long tail there with regards to the Story Pin functionality.
And I think from a creator standpoint, obviously I’ll get to brands in a second, they’re going hard in terms of leveraging that for the creators that are already built a good presence. I think from a brand perspective, as brands are kind of toying with the idea, and I’ve talked to plenty of them, particularly in the beauty space, recognizing that there could be some opportunity with regards to both pairing with creatives who’ve already kind of started to build a presence and are gaining a lot more momentum, now being able to use video inside the platform.
But then also brands themselves. And again, I mean, maybe not obviously, but my background was beauty. I was in the beauty space for about eight years. And so a lot of the brands that I’ve been talking to around what I’m building with The Candidly in the beauty space are very excited about the potential. Now granted, TBD on the dollars that are going to flow to that platform specifically. There’s also a handful of bigger name beauty brands who have really cut back on spend across other platforms because they’re looking for opportunities to kind of take a risk, take a chance. Because in their mind, it’s like there’s an opportunity essentially, potentially, on that platform, again, as they began to grow it out.
Now again, it’s still really early days for Pinterest. But I know from an internal standpoint having talked to them, they’re very eager to really roll this out. And Story Pins will be officially rolled out, because right now it’s in beta, come spring time. So they’re looking at around mid to end of April. So that’ll be able to be utilized for everybody. Right now, it’s in beta. My brand has been using it. We’ve seen a lot opportunity. And as I’m talking to brands and sharing with them just the capability, there’s been some interest there.

Gwen Miller:
I mean, look, when you’re talking about a platform that has over 300 million active users, and 71% of them are female. And so if you are a brand that is targeting a woman who is not a 12 year old. And we know that women of over a certain age make a large majority of purchasing decisions for a household. If you are a beauty brand, if you’re a CPG brand, why are you not on Pinterest? If you’re really looking for an audience that it is very niche and is also primed to purchase. You’re pinning everything to these boards. This is not a Reddit audience who’s like, ooh, suspicious of all brand brands. No, this is an audience that should be much more willing to buy.
So I think Stories is brilliant. I think this is going to be something that will change how we do things on the platform. So fill me in a little bit more. So you talked a little bit about right now you have to request access. It’s in beta. But they don’t disappear, which I think is really interesting. They’re really pins that stay there forever. And what is it? Is this horizontal? Is it vertical? What length can I put up? Can I put multiple videos in a single pin or just one video?

Leslie Morgan:
So it’s vertical. And then basically, I don’t know the cap in terms of, I guess you could consider it each frame per se. But I’ve seen a lot with regards to both DIY, recipe brands. Tastemade, I think has been doing a really great job actually using Pinterest for video. And it’s kind of dabbled in Story Pins as well. And I think the interesting thing in general when it comes to video content, if you’re smart about it, because I’ve always not been a fan of just like regurgitating the same content across platforms, right? You have to be really cognizant of your audience. But I would say even based on the trajectory that I’m seeing with a brand like a Tastemade, having looked at their content, I really appreciate what they’ve been doing in terms of fine tuning and tweaking what they’ve done.
So I can’t necessarily speak to exact length. But what I can say is you can create very, very long stories. And again, they are something that, with regards to just the long tail of it, that they’re up forever. And over time, you’re going to see ultimately better results. I mean, obviously with an IG story, it’s up and then it’s gone. You’ve got your window, and then it’s over. With Pinterest, they’re not doing that. So I think, look, it’s still in beta, right? So the thing that I hope that they tweak about it is right now, because I think with this specific tool, they’ve been a little bit more creator focused to start with. They’re not right now, you’re not able to kind of boost it in any way. It’s really organic traction. So that’s what I would say is probably the downfall right now and maybe a negative thing about it.
But again, it’s still really early days for them. They launched this a couple months ago. It’s in beta. They’re going to do a full launch come April. They are talking to a lot of brands, both brands like ourselves, but at scale that are editorial in nature, but also more traditional brands and the food beauty DIY, et cetera space. Because I think they’re also trying to pair those that have kind of built a really solid presence with brands. So they’re also really facilitating conversations with those parties, which I also really appreciate, frankly. Because I mean, and this is not to knock any other platform, I think every platform has a unique value proposition, right? But I have always appreciated, especially when a platform is trying something new, where they’re facilitating bigger conversations between brands and creatives that might not happen otherwise.

Dane Golden:
And-

Leslie Morgan:
And I think… Yeah, sorry, go ahead.

Dane Golden:
Well, I wanted to ask about that, and particularly about this mix of brands and creatives. But also I wanted to ask at this time, Pinterest video, you talk about the pins, the Story Pins, and you could also, for instance, embed a YouTube video. What sort of the possible options? Can you upload a 16 by nine native video to Pinterest? What would the length be? What are the other options of video?

Leslie Morgan:
Well right now as it stands, you have to actually do it within the confines of the platform. So it’s not as, I would say, cut and dry. The other thing I would mention is there are certainly tools that exist now that you’re not having to kind of rejigger everything yourself. And so you literally can go into a tool and say, “Okay, I need to this back,” and you just kind of upload it. So I don’t necessarily have the nitty-gritty in terms of, if you want to take something from a different platform.
I would also be really, like I said before, hyper-aware of doing that and being really cautious of that. Because I think, look, when I put myself in a user journey standpoint of any platform, because I always want to look at it from an audience point perspective, right? So if I’m on Pinterest, and I’m using it as the consumer, I find it to be kind of the one joyous platform out there.

Dane Golden:
Oh really? Okay.

Leslie Morgan:
You’re scrolling, and it’s this really lovely feed of different people’s content. It’s a very positive experience. I mean, I joke with other colleagues and teammates that it’s the one platform I think at night, there’s no such thing as a doom scroll for me when I’m looking at Pinterest. And so I think, like with anything, you want it to kind of catch your eye. And you want to stop, you’re going to kind of focus in. But the goal for a repin, a share. You basically click into it that brings you to another page completely. I mean, that’s the great thing about Pinterest is you’re sharing, and you’re building your own boards and you’re having a lot of control over your own journey in terms of it. And it tends to be really positive in my experience.

Dane Golden:
So you’re saying being native is what I’m hearing, is that correct?

Leslie Morgan:
Yes, yes.

Dane Golden:
Okay. And just as far as a business, a brand, what would be the one, two, three things you really need to be doing, we could call it in a marketing way? Sure. Let’s say in a marketing way.

Leslie Morgan:
With regards to Pinterest specifically?

Dane Golden:
Yeah. But also with video, since we’re a video focused podcast specifically.

Leslie Morgan:
Right. Well I mean, I think this is true with any platform. They’re really bullish on kind of original. So right now, when you think of that platform, whether video or not, they’ve been doing a lot of, “Oh, just repin, or repin.” I don’t want to say they’re getting rid of that because that’s not fair, but they are shining a light on anything that is deemed more original, exclusive. It’s something that isn’t being culled from somewhere else, or it’s not even a repin of somebody else’s thing. It’s something that you are basically natively uploading to Pinterest. It’s exclusive to that platform. Because I mean, look, I think like any platform, they really want to control their own space.
And so, I mean, you can say the same thing with what’s happening with Instagram and TikToK right now, right? I think everybody’s like, “Well, why didn’t that happen a year ago?” Everybody’s surprised it didn’t happen sooner. So even with Pinterest, they’re really focusing on make sure that it’s native, because from a functionality and actually being able to upload the content, you have to do it in the confines of the platform. And then it’s got to be something original. It’s got to be something that a Pinterest user would want essentially. So again, I don’t want to sit here and say, they’re going to knock it, or you’re going to take a hit in some way. I can’t speak to that. I just know based on my conversations with them, those are the things, I would say, like any platform, they want original content. They want content that’s native to them, right? I mean, those are the things that I think are true across the board, regardless of the platform that you’re using.

Gwen Miller:
Look, I know on YouTube, we always say, look, the content has to be not sellsy. But is there a place on Pinterest for product demonstrations where it is really a short video where you’re showing off this cool product, or really doesn’t need to be like on YouTube where it’s like a tip on, I don’t know, dry walling, and you happen to also be a business.

Leslie Morgan:
I mean, I definitely seen just integrations happen seamlessly. And to me again, I’m kind of putting my user hat on just for a second, I think if it’s really great content and you’re telling a good story, I don’t really think it’s going to matter. And to be fair, I really feel like, again, right now, it’s still early days, right? So it’s hard to determine and for me to say very matter of factly they’re going to lean one way or another. But when I think about, and what I’m seeing on the platform, it’s going both ways. I don’t think it’s like, well, it’s got to be very… When you think about YouTube, when you think about a DIY video, and then you think about the 20 second at the top integration, this is sponsored by blah, right? I don’t necessarily see that as an issue right now for Pinterest at this point as long as there’s like key takeaways, right?
Pinterest is about is it something that I can learn, I can do, I can use, I can take part with in a meaningful way. I mean, think about even how the platform started. Again, in terms of just pinning things that you as a user are interested in doing or using. So I would say on the brand side, as long as there’s clear takeaways, again, I haven’t seen anything that is egregious from a product placement standpoint. And I’m sure there could be. Again, I think it’s like any platform. I think it’s like how do you tell a story about creating a great cake recipe, or a cat eye with an eyeliner pencil, right? It’s still the same mechanism. It’s just, I think in the way that they are able to do it is slightly different than these other platforms.

Gwen Miller:
Right. Okay. So businesses often have limited resources. What would be your argument for why a business might say head towards some of these other platforms, like a Pinterest, rather than say going straight to YouTube if they cannot afford to do both?

Leslie Morgan:
And again, I mean, this is my own POV based on being in this space for so long, but with YouTube, I think it’s so saturated. I think it’s tougher unless you have the right mechanisms to market it properly, et cetera, the right talent involved. I was talking to a colleague of recently who is doing a branded campaign with a spirit brand. And the spirit brand was like, “We’re just going to put it up on YouTube.” And I was like, “Wait, wait, wait, wait.” It’s like, “What’s your strategy? What’s the marketing spend? What’s this?” “Oh, no, we’re just going to put it up.” And I’m like, “Okay.” And not to say that you should do that on any platform. I want to be really clear. I think you need like a path forward, whatever the platform is, as a brand, as a product. There’s levers that you need to pull from a dollar standpoint in order to get eyeballs to your content.
But I get nervous sometimes with YouTube. Because I mean, now YouTube is in a much different place than certainly when I first started it back in 2011, right? Where it’s like, oh, it can be five minutes of content and it can be once a week. And I just think the mechanisms needed to be successful on YouTube could be a much bigger spend. Whereby if you have limited dollars, and you use something like a Pinterest, and we’re going to talk about a TikTok that you can shoot it all on your phone. And look, I don’t want to dumb this down, but you can do it in such a way that I feel like is a lighter lift. Both from a length standpoint, right? Because I think the content that’s doing well on YouTube typically is a longer length.
So if you’re shooting something with it’s 60 seconds of content versus 20 minutes of content, there’s that piece of it. Certainly if you’ve done that, and you can pull out things that kind of, again, can reflect what you want to do on a different platform without it feeling cheesy or something that you’ve just extrapolated randomly and put on a different platform because that’s not going to get you anywhere either.
But I think the other point I was going to make too, with something like a Pinterest and TikToK, they’re excited. They want more content. I think it’s easier to, at least in my experience, find somebody at the platform to talk to and have a conversation with. You’re talking about hundreds of millions of users compared to millions of users, right? And so I think there’s an accessibility as well that they’re open to speaking to you.
And I’m not going to say that that’s not the case with YouTube. That’s not fair. But I think with so many creators on that platform, with so many things that they’re trying to do and move forward on, and the fact that they have their arms wrapped around advertisers. And yes, there’ve been challenges with YouTube with regards to that piece of it, et cetera. But back in 2011, that was their big goal, right? If that’s now the goal in 2021 for TikToK and Pinterest, you have to think about where those companies are versus where YouTube is now.

Dane Golden:
And in particular, as we move on to talk about TikToK, one of your other topics that you feel some brands are still sleeping on, if you were to say in one or two sentences, why someone should not be sleeping on TikToK, a marketer, why would that be?

Leslie Morgan:
I mean, look at what e.l.f. cosmetics did back in, I think it was late ’19 or early ’20. I mean, they created an entire show, and it boosted their sales extremely well. And so same thing. Look, I think, they were really smart in their approach. They got in at the perfect time. They didn’t have to use anybody of some crazy high influence to market it. It wasn’t like somebody with a billion views on TikToK, they’re partnering with them. They didn’t have to do that. They were able to really get in there. And look, I mean, TikToK has always been known for a younger demo. They’ve worked really hard over the past several years to make that a platform that is encouraging to somebody that’s older, looking at a 35-plus. Whether you’re looking at high profile talent influencers, and even brands that are starting to use it. Sorry, that was more than a few sentences. I went on a tangent. Sorry about that.

Gwen Miller:
All right. So let’s say like, look, this has been fascinating to me because I think this is where my brain’s trying to catch up to TikTok. It’s like, you have something like a YouTube where the brand integration is fairly obvious. You have a 20 minute video. Two minutes near the beginning, we’re going to talk about the brand. Obviously when you’re talking about 60 second max videos, that doesn’t really work. So what are the options for brands and marketing on the platform? You can’t really be as lazy, not that you’re lazy on YouTube, but you can let the rest of the content do a lot of the heavy lift on getting people to watch it. Whereas this, the content has to be good on its own. What do brands need to be thinking about when they’re jumping into this space in terms of how they market on this platform?

Leslie Morgan:
I think similarly to what I was saying with Pinterest is just thinking about the user experience. I mean, number one, I think the challenge with a TikTok is it’s completely algorithm based. So you have to really be cognizant. I mean, hopefully brands are, but you have to be really hyper-aware of who do you want to target? And making sure you can get in front of those people. Because it’s more about as a user, you’re scrolling through, you like something. It’s going to give you more of the thing that you like, right? And so I think it is, especially if you don’t have a huge budget, you can basically wrap it around a few individuals, et cetera, that could target for you, right?
Because again, it’s all algorithm based, which is a little trickier, frankly. It’s not like with YouTube, we used to do view buys and those kinds of things. And the targeting is going to be different and the nuances are going to be different. And I don’t necessarily know all the nuances of it, but I think the challenge for any brand looking at it is you have to really make sure that you are aware of the fact that it’s about their own personal user experience. They are feeding the consumer what the consumer wants based on the choices that they are making within the confines of the scroll experience.

Dane Golden:
And you talked about e.l.f and what they’re doing on TikTok. But what would you say are some of the other really good case studies, or just examples of specific brands that are really doing it right on TikTok, and what are they doing? And I’ll even add another third question to that is how do you do it wrong?

Leslie Morgan:
I mean, I can start with how do you do it wrong? And I think a really good example of doing it wrong, again, I won’t name the brand, but I’ll give you an example of a brand that really did it wrong

Dane Golden:
But it rhymes with Bicrosoft. We’re not going to say what name. No, no, just kidding. Just kidding. Just kidding.

Leslie Morgan:
Actually, it’s a beauty brand. I’ll say that much. And they partnered with one of the largest creators on TikTok. The problem was there was zero alignment. But again, I mean, I think that’s an example of something that you probably could say across platforms. But they were like, “Well, they’re going to hit our algorithm. Of course, this demo loves beauty products.” Which they do, but this person, the kind of content that they were doing is more family oriented. And they did another partnership, which made more sense because they love coffee. You know what I mean? So when they, as a beauty brand, being like, “Oh, I’m going to hit this young woman. She’s completely targeting exactly who I want.” But there was a complete disconnect in terms of what actually ended up happening, and it fell really flat.
And I can say this because I ended up speaking to the brand. And I said, “Hey, how did this partnership go for you?” And they said, “It was terrible because we didn’t get the ROI that we had expected.” But going into it, I was also surprised that they even went in that direction to begin with, because when I thought about it, I was like, well, yeah, there’s just not alignment. Because I think you think of this individual, you do not think of high end skin masks and lip balms and whatnot, right? So yeah. And again, look, that’s not just a TikTok problem. I think that’s something that is across the board.

Gwen Miller:
It does feel right now that brands kind of, a lot of ways right now, unintentionally interacting with TikTok more than anything else. You have the really great examples, like Ocean Spray, and I’m going to murder his name, and Nathan Apodaca. That was just fortuitous, and they responded right. But I think it’s going to be interesting to see as brands take the more proactive approach, what they’re getting right and wrong.
And I am going to name names, or you can be in the other side where you have a fortuitous TikToK experience like Sherwin-Williams and Tony Piloseno, which was the paint kid. But their reaction to that was a little dated as well. So I think it e.l.f. is very interesting because they purposely interacted. And I feel like a lot of them were famous case studies are really brand who were like, “We don’t know what this TikTok is, but we got drug into it against our will. So how are we going to react now?”

Leslie Morgan:
Right. Well even something like, I mean, a Starface. And not to say that they’re not targeting certain people, and look, they’re all over the place. I mean, I see them on Instagram all the time too. But I think that you’re getting people also that just genuinely are using the product. I mean, Ocean Spray again, perfect example of that, right? You couldn’t get more organic. It’s not like he got paid to drink the bottle of Ocean Spray as he was skateboarding. So like you’re saying, I think there’s kind of the brands that are just kind of, I don’t want to say lucky, but you’ve got consumers using the product, showcasing it off in a really meaningful way.
I think with regards to other brands, I mean, I always think Red Bull is ahead of its time and ahead of the curve in terms of what they’re doing. Yeah. I mean, Gymshark, I’ve seen some of the content that they’ve done. Look, I think a lot of the time you’re looking at these kinds of DTC brands, right? I mean, those are two that I’ve just spoke out of which they’re direct to consumer, they understand the kinds of things that are going to resonate with the consumer, and they’re jumping in head first and trying it out. And they’re seeing conversion.
And it’s also, again, I mean to me, it doesn’t matter the platform, it’s about consistency. It’s about good content, right? I mean, all of those things apply no matter what platform you’re on. I think that right now, again talk to me in a few months, this might be different in six months, it definitely will be different. There is a lower barrier of entry from a starting off standpoint. And that’s really, from my perspective, the benefit. It’s like, you’re not jumping into a platform that has been around since 2006. And again, with TikTok, it was Musical.ly. But the stuff that they were doing is different now since they’ve changed everything over, and with the acquisition of ByteDance. And TBD, how things will even play out with that platform. I mean, I think potentially things will be fine. But what three, four months ago, everyone was like, “Oh, better move to Triller. TikTok’s going away.”

Gwen Miller:
Right, right. Maybe just to finish things up, leave us with a couple sentences, Leslie, on obviously marketing brand is different than creating an organic channel, but what are some of the things that brands can learn from organic creators on TikTok, about the joy of TikTok?

Leslie Morgan:
There’s just this, I think, natural authenticity. I mean, I think number one, regardless of, I think what everybody’s trying to do with the platform, it’s still a slightly younger demo. And when I say younger, I mean, we’re still talking about Gen Z college. And so to me, if you’re looking to target that audience, jump on that platform. I mean kind of the converse with Pinterest where they’re aiming for younger, but they’re still a little bit older. So jump in, depending on the demo you’re trying to hit.
And then, I think the other thing to do as a brand, start watching other people’s content and seeing what’s working. And look, it might not work for you. But I mean, again, I think you’ve got these really great examples of direct to consumer. They understand user behavior. And so you have to really understand who you’re trying to acquire as a customer and lean into that, right? I don’t think it’s going to be about just jump on the next big influencer train. I don’t really think that works unless there’s not only true alignment, but also the influencer having a real stake in it. Because influencers do this all the time. They’re not going to do anything for you that they’re not going to do for somebody else’s brand. So you got to have somebody that’s going to put some skin in the game if you want to go in that direction.

Dane Golden:
Wow. Leslie Morgan, your company’s called Candidly, and how can our listeners find out more, maybe connect with you online, and your tweets, your pins, all your stuff?

Leslie Morgan:
So at Twitter, I’m at Morganglory. My consulting business is Morganglory Consulting. So you can find me at Morganglory, and that’s my handle across any platform. So feel free to DM me, and I’m happy to respond.

Dane Golden:
Excellent. Thank you, Leslie Morgan. My name is Dane Golden with my cohost Gwen Miller. We want to thank you, the listener, for joining us today. Isn’t that right, Gwen?

Gwen Miller:
Absolutely Dane. You and our listeners teach me something new every week, which is why I love being on this podcast.

Dane Golden:
And I want to invite you, the listener, to review us on Apple Podcast. We are rapidly climbing the ranking on Apple Podcast for the term video marketing, and I want you to review us. And hey, you know what, if you think we’re bad, I want you to tell me, and if you think we’re good, I want you to tell me. Share and let us know on that app. The Apple Podcast app is really key for success for any podcast. And Gwen and I do this podcast and our various other independent videos and projects because we love helping marketers and businesses, just like you, do YouTube and all kinds of video marketing better. Thanks to our special guest, Leslie Morgan. Thank you, Leslie.

Leslie Morgan:
Thank you guys. Appreciate it.

Dane Golden:
Until next week here’s to helping you help your customers through video.

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